Media

At Balmoral Hall School, we love to share the stories of our students' learning.

Whether it's a week of experiential learning, a day of community outreach, or exciting discoveries in our technology or traditional science labs, there is always something to talk about. 

We are pleased to offer this "at a glance" version of our newsfeed. Check back often!

Note: for the latest news articles, be sure to hit "refresh".

 

School News

List of 1 news stories.

  • Isra and Shauna (December 2018)

    CAREER TALK WITH SHAUNA LABMAN '95

    By Isra Elbarouni, Grade 8

    "Does anybody know who Yahya Sumatar is?"

    Back in 2015, Yahya Samatar, a 35-year-old Somalian man who fought for democracy back in his home country, swam through the Red River from North Dakota to Winnipeg. Being a human rights worker back in Somalia, Yahya was captured and tortured by Al-Shabaab, the same militant group that murdered his brother. After paying the ransom, he fled to America, leaving his family behind in August 2014. When he got to America, he was denied refugee status and sent to a detention centre for six months. Walking all the way to the Canadian border in North Dakota, he gazed off into the distance, Manitoba.

    Now that you know the story right up until he swam across the Red River, here’s the catch. According to the Canada—United States Safe Third Country Agreement, people should apply for asylum and refugee status in the first country of their arrival. If they have already applied as a refugee in the U.S. before showing up at a border port in Canada, and have no blood relatives there, they are turned away. But if a person crosses into Canada somewhere else and then applies as a refugee, the case is heard in court. Well, America denied refugee status for Yahya, and Canada seemed like the best second choice. Sensibly afraid of persecution, he took a leap of faith and swam.

    After being welcomed by hospitable Manitobans, Yahya’s case was heard in the Canadian system. The case was indomitable, according to Shauna Labman '95, who teaches immigration and refugee law at University of Manitoba's Robson Hall. Dr. Labman, an alumna of Balmoral Hall School, spoke with Grade 8 students last month.
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Alumnae News

List of 1 news stories.

  • Isra and Shauna (December 2018)

    CAREER TALK WITH SHAUNA LABMAN '95

    By Isra Elbarouni, Grade 8

    "Does anybody know who Yahya Sumatar is?"

    Back in 2015, Yahya Samatar, a 35-year-old Somalian man who fought for democracy back in his home country, swam through the Red River from North Dakota to Winnipeg. Being a human rights worker back in Somalia, Yahya was captured and tortured by Al-Shabaab, the same militant group that murdered his brother. After paying the ransom, he fled to America, leaving his family behind in August 2014. When he got to America, he was denied refugee status and sent to a detention centre for six months. Walking all the way to the Canadian border in North Dakota, he gazed off into the distance, Manitoba.

    Now that you know the story right up until he swam across the Red River, here’s the catch. According to the Canada—United States Safe Third Country Agreement, people should apply for asylum and refugee status in the first country of their arrival. If they have already applied as a refugee in the U.S. before showing up at a border port in Canada, and have no blood relatives there, they are turned away. But if a person crosses into Canada somewhere else and then applies as a refugee, the case is heard in court. Well, America denied refugee status for Yahya, and Canada seemed like the best second choice. Sensibly afraid of persecution, he took a leap of faith and swam.

    After being welcomed by hospitable Manitobans, Yahya’s case was heard in the Canadian system. The case was indomitable, according to Shauna Labman '95, who teaches immigration and refugee law at University of Manitoba's Robson Hall. Dr. Labman, an alumna of Balmoral Hall School, spoke with Grade 8 students last month.
    Read More
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Giving News

List of 1 news stories.

  • A LETTER FROM OUR FAMILY TO YOURS

    Anthony Battad, MD, MSc, MPH, FRCPC

    I would like you to know why my family chooses to support Balmoral Hall School through charitable giving.

    My wife Gisèle and I have two daughters; Mia is a Grade 12 student and lifelong BH girl, and Katelyn, also a lifer, graduated in June. She is in the process of writing her first exams at Queen's University. When we think about how well she is adjusting to university life – as she is just beginning to realize her true potential – we are proud that she received a top-notch education at Balmoral Hall.

    We have the school community, our BH family, to thank for this. Teachers and staff genuinely care about our daughters. Generous donors – parents, grandparents, and alumnae – show their support, year after year, for programming and resources that are not available anywhere else. Mia's interest in technology is guiding her pursuit of post-secondary studies in computer science. The tech she has access to at Balmoral Hall has created unique opportunities for her that are only possible thanks to past and current donors.

    As the Chair of the Advancement Committee of the Board of Governors, I support efforts to create a culture of philanthropy at Balmoral Hall School.

    Gisèle and I share our values as community-minded parents with our daughters. They each support their class funds however they can so that future students will prosper, too, with the help of scholarships and bursaries. As a family, we have given to the Centre for Arts & Design annually since fundraising efforts began two years ago.

    Even though Katelyn will, and Mia might, never experience the Centre for Arts & Design, we understand the importance of fostering creativity through enriched learning in science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics (STEAM).

    We are proud to support innovation in girls' education, and we eagerly await the grand opening in a few months' time. If you, like us, are excited by the thought of paying it forward, then I ask you to consider Balmoral Hall School as you make your charitable giving plans this holiday season. Thanks, in advance.

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Student News

List of 1 news stories.

  • Isra and Shauna (December 2018)

    CAREER TALK WITH SHAUNA LABMAN '95

    By Isra Elbarouni, Grade 8

    "Does anybody know who Yahya Sumatar is?"

    Back in 2015, Yahya Samatar, a 35-year-old Somalian man who fought for democracy back in his home country, swam through the Red River from North Dakota to Winnipeg. Being a human rights worker back in Somalia, Yahya was captured and tortured by Al-Shabaab, the same militant group that murdered his brother. After paying the ransom, he fled to America, leaving his family behind in August 2014. When he got to America, he was denied refugee status and sent to a detention centre for six months. Walking all the way to the Canadian border in North Dakota, he gazed off into the distance, Manitoba.

    Now that you know the story right up until he swam across the Red River, here’s the catch. According to the Canada—United States Safe Third Country Agreement, people should apply for asylum and refugee status in the first country of their arrival. If they have already applied as a refugee in the U.S. before showing up at a border port in Canada, and have no blood relatives there, they are turned away. But if a person crosses into Canada somewhere else and then applies as a refugee, the case is heard in court. Well, America denied refugee status for Yahya, and Canada seemed like the best second choice. Sensibly afraid of persecution, he took a leap of faith and swam.

    After being welcomed by hospitable Manitobans, Yahya’s case was heard in the Canadian system. The case was indomitable, according to Shauna Labman '95, who teaches immigration and refugee law at University of Manitoba's Robson Hall. Dr. Labman, an alumna of Balmoral Hall School, spoke with Grade 8 students last month.
    Read More
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Balmoral Hall School

Our mission at Balmoral Hall School is to inspire girls' imagination and courage to excel, to reach, to lead, to care.

We are a day and boarding school, offering an exceptional educational experience to girls aged 2 through Grade 12.